Monday, June 5, 2017

Who wants $25 to spend at Teachers Pay Teachers?????

Hi Friends!  I am participating in a giveaway I think you might want to enter.
This would be a great way to stock up on resources to get you through the year or to start next year off right.  

GIVEAWAY DETAILS:
  
Prize: $25 Teachers Pay Teachers Gift Card
Giveaway Organized by: Kelly Malloy (An Apple for the Teacher)
Rules: Use the Rafflecopter to enter.  Giveaway ends 6/12/17 and is open worldwide.
Are you a Teacher Blogger or Teachers pay Teachers seller who wants to participate in giveaways like these to grow your store and social media?  Click here to find out how you can join our totally awesome group of bloggers!


a Rafflecopter giveaway

Sunday, June 4, 2017

Phonemic Awareness is so much fun!!!



YAY!
You must have clicked to read this for one of two reasons.
1.  You think phonemic awareness is super fun too!
2.  You really hate teaching phonemic awareness and want to see why I think it is fun.

Whatever reason you are here I am so glad that you are!!!

I used to hate teaching phonemic awareness, but I kept at it, and now it is one of my favorite things to teach!

Today we are going to focus mainly on segmenting.

Segmenting in general is a huge skill.   It needs to be taught in many different steps.  Here is how I like to teach segmenting.

1.  Segmenting Syllables (read my post about this here)

2.  Segment off the First Sound

This game is the easiest way that I have found to teach first sound.  Plus they LOVE it.   Roll the ball to them, say a word, they have to say the first sound, and then roll the ball back.



3.  Segment off the Ending Sound.  This just takes a ton of practice for a lot of kids to get.   I use the ball game above (but use a different ball to help their brain switch from beginning to ending sounds.)   I also really like to start using the Chipper Chat here because they need a lot of practice.

4.  Segmenting out the Middle Sound.   If you thought ending sounds took forever then strap in.  This can be so hard for struggling readers.   Again repeated practice it the key.

5.  Segment Onset-Rime
Onset-Rhyme is when you segment off the first sound in the word, and then say the rest of the word.  I have found using just these card stock cards for this activity work really well.   Say the first sound and point to the first card and then say the rest of the word.




6.  Segment two sound words.   Students segment all the sounds in the word.  I start with short two sound words to do this.   Such as go, me, hi, my, etc.

7.  Segment three sounds in words.  This is where we get down to the nitty gritty to get them reading.  They need to be able to segment and blend sounds orally before they will be able to do it in print.

This foam chopper works perfect.   They "chop" out all the sounds in the word.



8.  Segmenting four sounds and BEYOND!   Make sure you are mixing in short vowels long vowels, etc.  I see students really hit a wall with beginning and ending blends.   SO lots of repeated practice and tons of different activities are important at this level.


I love using these lights.  They tap a light for each sound.



Or puppets...he is putting down one finger for each sound!



Or this sound board, you can get it free HERE.   I put it in a plastic sleeve and almost always use some sort of snack when we do it.  Clean up is so EASY and it makes the game so much more enticing.  Pull down each sound then blend the word back together.

Remember to warm up with segmenting daily.  Usually before we start reading words I will give them some of the words orally for them to segment before we start.  

You might like to see my favorite phonemic resources HERE.  

Want more great reading ideas?  CLICK HERE

Thanks for stopping by!
Amy

P.S.  There are affiliate links in this post, in case you want to purchase these materials.  Thanks for supporting my book addiction! 




My TOP Phonemic Awareness Resources for you to use!


Phonemic Awareness...
oh how I have struggled over the years...
I know it is important,
I've heard that it is easy to do,
I know that just 5 minutes a day can make a huge impact,
but...

I get all the why's...but I struggle with the who, the what, and the when!

I did find if I make sure I start my day with phonemic awareness or pair it with another habit that we do (like lining up for lunch)  then I get it in so much more consonantly.

While this is still a major focus of mine to improve on, I do have some products I would like to share with you that have really helped me out over the years!  Yes, these are affiliate links, no I don't get enough money to go on my dream vacation to Hawaii if you click on them, but I do get to buy a new book now and then, so thank-you!

1.   This book is awesome.   When I taught Kindergarten I used it everyday.   It has phonemic awareness sheets that match your favorite read alouds.  I would read the story then do the sound matching sheet that matched the story, we would pair it with snack time and use cereal as markers, then eat them afterward.   It was seriously the best part of my day, and those students could ROCK their phonemic awareness!

2.  The person that made the Chipper Chat just gets kids.   The word lists in this book are a teacher's dream and the game is a student's dream come true.  Which of your students would not love to use magnetic chips and a magnetic wand?   I loved to use this in my small group lessons as a warm up.  It took me awhile to figure out how to match activities to students and how to progress through the book, but the ease and fun makes this a number 1 in my book.


You may also want to grab these...



Those are my top TWO favorite phonemic awareness resources.  I found as long as I am consistently doing phonemic awareness everyday, I get good results.  So at the very least just start doing it, even if it's not a perfect plan.  Start playing with sounds with your students.  When they line up,  before you read a story, at snack time, whenever you can fit it in, just do it.  Below are some other books that I have on my shelf that I pull from time to time.  


I am ALWAYS looking for new ideas on this topic.  If you have any books to share please share them in the comments!!!

Do you have an easy way to incorporate phonemic awareness into your routine? I'd love to hear about!  Email me at 180daysofreading@gmail.com


Keep playing with those sounds!
Amy

If you liked this post, you might also like to read about how I teach Voiced and Unvoiced sounds to my readers.   CLICK HERE.











Saturday, April 22, 2017

Super Hero Day is April 28th!

Super Hero Day is April 28th!


This is a great day to celebrate in your classroom.   Make it a theme for the whole day.  Download my Super Hero Freebie right here to get started:



Your students will love creating their own super hero, playing tic-tac-toe, and searching and finding!



I have also been pinning ideas like crazy on my pinterest board.  Click here to get some great ideas.  



I also have TONS of super hero games in my store.  Just click on the super hero tab.  They are a great way to combine fun and learning!   


You can practice














These are some of my student's favorite games. I LOVE to use games in my intervention groups.  They make learning fun. 


Want to earn free products from my store?
Click here:  FREE PRODUCTS!  

Want to join my EXCLUSIVE email list?


Have a fun day!
Amy




Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Feel the letter!


Ok.  So you have been teaching letter names for a while now and you are looking for some activities to do to reinforce what they have learned.
LOOK NO FURTHER!
Your students will love these activities!

1.  FEEL THE LETTER:

Put capital letters into a cup.  
Have students take turns.
One student closes their eyes and picks a letter.
With their eyes closed they feel the letter, and try to guess which letter it is. 
If they guess right, they keep the letter. 
When all the letters are gone, the player with the most letters wins!  
Play with just a few letters at a time to start with.  Make sure students know the letter names of the letters.  Need help teaching letter recognition?  Read what I do here.


2.  SING THE ALPHABET:
Get silly with the alphabet.  Students need to be very familiar with alphabet order.  Sing it loud, sing it soft, and have fun.  There are tons of CD's that can help you have fun with the alphabet.  Some of my favorites are  Dr. Jean & Friends and  Sing to Learn with Dr. Jean
If you have never heard of Dr. Jean you HAVE to check her out!  




We had so much fun practicing the alphabet this summer with these awesome window markers.  Wouldn't this look great on a classroom door?  

3.  ALPHABET ORDER:

Give them lots of practice with putting letters in alphabet order.  Make it fun!  I LOVE to use food in my lessons.  Those little buggers are always hungry.  These are perfect.  Use them for alphabet order and then word building.  Keep on learning during snack time! Yum.  CHEEZ IT!



I also love these dough stampers!  Roll out the dough  and stamp the alphabet.  These great for building words too! 


4. WRITE THE ALPHABET:

Have you had your students write the alphabet in order?  Ask them to.  I was really surprised at how hard this was for some of my struggling readers.  We practice writing the alphabet for fluency a couple times a week. I LOVE to use this printable at centers and as a warm-up for my intervention groups.  I put them in a plastic sleeve, and use a dry erase markers to write on them.  This has been a class favorite this year.  You can get this printable free HERE.  


You can add these alphabet activities to the beginning or the end of any activity!  They work great in interventions! 

Enjoy!
Amy


Sunday, February 12, 2017

Earn free products from my store!




Hi Friends!  

I've been reading all the awesome feedback you have been leaving at my store (thank you by the way) and I love to hear how you are using my products in the classroom!  I love it so much I decided I wanted to see more!  I'd love to actually see my products in your classroom!

I'm offering FREE products in exchange for a picture.   
Want to know how? 
Keep reading!  

Do you already own one of my products?  Perfect!!!
If not click here and get one!
Download the product, use it in your classroom, and take a picture.  Post that picture on social media.  Tag me so I can see it!!   Easy peasy as the kids say. 

Email me at 180daysofreading@gmail.com and tell me where you posted your picture,  in case I missed it.  Then tell me which product you would like from my store for free!!  You can choose any product under $2.00 in my store and I will email it to you! 

Want to try it, but don't own any of my products yet?
No problem.
I have tons of freebies in my store.
You can use one of those!  Yes!  You read that right!

Download, use, post,and tag one of my free products, email me and get a $2.00 or less product from my store for free!!!  

I also have tons of products for just $.50 right HERE.

Give it a try, let me know what you think! This will give me a chance to see my products in the hands of students other than my own and a way to pay it forward with more great products for your classroom!  Win win!   

Wondering what social media I use?   Here are my accounts below!

Facebook
Twitter
Instagram
Pinterest

Have any questions, suggestions, or ideas?   Email me!   180daysofreading@gmail.com
I can't wait to see what you share!!! 
Amy


Sunday, February 5, 2017

Let me help you open your Teachers Pay Teachers Store!






Hi Friends!
Are you a teacher?
Do you like helping other teachers?
Are you creative and like making things?
Could you use some extra money?  (of course you could you are a teacher)
Let me help you!

I can help you start your store, and give tips and tricks that I have learned along the way.


To get this easy step by step tutorial sent right to your inbox.

Ready to get started right now?  Follow these easy steps below.










That's all.  You are officially a Teachers Pay Teachers Seller!  Way to go!
I'm so excited for you!

Email me at 180daysofreading@gmail.com so we can celebrate together!







Friday, August 19, 2016

Do you teach voiced and unvoiced to your struggling readers?

Or is this something that you have learned about, but have never really felt comfortable teaching?
This was me just last year.
I understood that there were some letter sounds that were voiced and some that were unvoiced, but honestly even trying it myself I was having a hard time figuring out which was which.
Until, I figured out this is one of those thing that you only get comfortable with by doing.
So, over the last year I have been teaching this in my intervention groups and it has made such a difference!

What is voiced and unvoiced?

I'm sure there is a a more technical way of explaining it, but basically some letter sounds are made with your voice box on and some are made with your voice box off.
Try it.
Put your hand on your throat like my son is doing below. (He never wears a shirt)
Make the /s/ sound.
Does your throat do anything?
Try the /m/ sound.
How about now?
Feel the difference?
When you can feel your throat vibrating it is voiced, when your throat does not vibrate it is unvoiced.


This becomes so important in teaching letter sounds.    Th is a good example.  Say this.  Say thin.  Can you tell the difference?  This is something our Speech and Language teachers have been doing for years, with students with speech and language delays.  

I introduce it to my students as a general concept.  This is before I explicitly start teaching letter sounds.  I want them to understand that sounds can be voiced or unvoiced.  When I explicitly teach a sound we check to see if it is voiced and unvoiced so it is important that they have a basic understanding of this.  

I explain what voiced and unvoiced is, and we try making some sounds to see if we can feel the difference.  I have them put their hand on their throat and feel the difference.  I will say make this sound /m/, and have them repeat the sound, rather than saying make the sound that m makes.  We go through and do this for a few sounds.  I made this sort to do together.  Students should not be expected to do this independently unless they know all of their letter sounds.


Get it HERE.


Try it with your students.  Don't worry if you fumble or are unsure.  Students like it when you learn with them...plus I included a cheat sheet for you :).

If you try it let me know how it goes!  Come back and leave me a comment or send me an email at 180daysofreading@gmail.com.

Amy

You might also like to read:  Let's Talk About Letter Naming Interventions 


Thursday, August 18, 2016

Let's Talk Letter Naming Interventions

What is an intervention?
In a sense it is very much what the word says.
You intervene to assist a student in learning a skill, that they are struggling with.
Most of the time if you teach the skill again to the student using the same strategies they were taught t the first time, you will probably still see them struggle.
Has this ever happened to you?
It sure has happened to me...a lot.
What you need to do in the intervention is re-teach the skill that they are having trouble with, but you want to try some different strategies than they learned with the first time.
I have found using multisensory strategies give me the most bang for my buck.
Having students, see, say and feel what they are learning really makes it stick.

I have found salt/sand to be my best friend.



Students can trace what they are learning in the sand, they see, say and feel it, and it sticks!
This plastic canvas has also worked miracles.  I bought mine at Walmart.  (Yes it is the same stuff you used to use yarn and a huge plastic needle to sew with when you were 8)  Who knew it could teach kids to read?


If you have a student having a hard time learning something have them see, say, and trace it.  I hope you see results like I have!

I have found this strategy to be so effective when teaching letter names, pair it with a systematic sequential lesson plan, and BAM, kids know their letter names.  

I'm excited to teach a whole new batch of Kindergarten students their letter names in a couple weeks.
I've created a systematic sequential lesson plan that uses multisensory strategies, as well as a recording sheet for each letter to keep me on track.

Here is the recording sheet for A.
I can place the plastic canvas right on top of the large A so they can trace it.
They can practice writing it on their own, and then practice some LNF fluency as well as review previous letters, at the bottom. I have this all spelled out in the lesson plan.

Get my complete intervention lesson plan and kit HERE

I have also been told that I will be getting some volunteers to help me out this year.  YAY!  So I made this kit for my volunteers.  It is ready to go, and has a sample lesson plan for them and a recording sheet so I can keep track of who they worked with, and how the students did.  I have been using this with my four year old at home this summer!



There is a letter matching component,


multisensory component,


handwriting practice,


and fluency practice!


You can check it out HERE.

Want to know what else I do to teach letter names?  Check it out here.





I would love to hear what you do to teach letter names to your students.  Leave me a comment or send me an email at 180daysofreading@gmail.com

Amy